Veterinary Definitions

Veterinary Medical Definitions A to Z

 

Veterinary Medical Definitions A to Z is a list of terms sometimes used by veterinarians during the diagnosis and treatment of your pet.  If you don’t understand something hat we say, ask, or check below, for details.

 

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 

A

AAFCO Association of American Feed Control Officials; an organization which sets standards for pet food ingredients and minimum daily requirements.

Abdomen A region of the body between the chest and the pelvis; belly.

Abdominocentesis The insertion of a needle into the abdominal cavity to remove fluids.

ACE Inhibitor Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor: Drug which decreases the function of this particular enzyme. The angiotensin-converting-enzyme changes a compound called angiotensin I to angiotensin II. Angiotensin II is a potent blood vessel constrictor. ACE inhibitors, then, have the effect of dilating blood vessels, since less Angiotensin II is produced.

Acid A fluid containing a high proportion of hydrogen ions, giving the liquid a sour taste. Measured by pH units, with 1 the most acid, and 14 the least acid. Chemical reactions in the body have to take place at or near neutrality, pH 7.

ACTH Adrenocorticotropic hormone. A hormone, secreted by the pituitary gland, which stimulates the adrenal gland to work.

Activated Charcoal Charcoal which has been treated to increase its adsorptive power (ability to have chemicals adhere to it); used to treat various forms of poisoning.

Active Immunity Immunity produced when an animal's own immune system reacts to a stimulus e.g., a virus or bacteria, and produces antibodies and cells which will protect it from the disease caused by the bacteria or virus. Compare with 'passive immunity.'

Acute Having a sudden and generally severe onset. See also Chronic.

Adjuvant A substance added to killed vaccines to stimulate a better immune response by the body. Common adjuvants contain aluminum compounds.

Adrenal Glands Two small glands near the kidneys that produce many hormones required for life.

Adrenaline A hormone produced by the adrenal glands that elevates heart and respiration rates; also called 'epinephrine.'

Adrenergic Communication between the nerves and muscles that uses epinephrine as the 'messenger.' Adrenergic stimulation is what is involved in the 'flight or fight' response, which means the body is alerted to a danger of some sort and prepares to basically run or fight. Adrenergic stimulation results in an increased heart rate, sweating, and increased blood pressure.

Adsorbent A solid substance which attracts other molecules to its surface.

Adulticide Medication formulated to kill adult forms of a parasite.

Aerobic Needing oxygen to live. See also Anaerobic bacteria.

Aerobic Bacteria Bacteria that require oxygen to survive and grow.

Agglutination Clumping together.

Albino An animal that is completely white because it lacks the ability to make pigment. Its eyes are pale blue or pink.

Albumin A protein in the blood responsible for the maintenance of osmotic (water) pressure in the blood; also binds (attaches) to large molecules in the blood and serves to transport them; produced by the liver; also called 'serum albumin.'

Aldosterone A hormone secreted by the adrenal gland that stimulates sodium (and therefore water) retention and potassium excretion; important in blood pressure maintenance.

Alimentary Pertaining to food or the digestive tract.

Alkaline A substance with very few hydrogen ions, and a pH over 7. Lye is strongly alkaline.

Allergen A substance that causes an allergic reaction, e.g., pollen.

Alopecia A loss of hair or baldness.

Alveoli The tiny microscopic areas of the lung where the actual exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide into and out of the blood occurs. Also called alveolus and alveolar sacs.

Aminoglycoside A class of antibiotics which act by interfering with bacterial protein synthesis within the bacteria which results in the death of the bacteria. Antibiotics in this class include gentamicin (Gentocin), kanamycin, neomycin, streptomycin, tobramycin, and amikacin. Many of these antibiotics are not well-absorbed from the animal's digestive system, so are often administered as injections, or used topically.

Amylase Digestive enzyme, produced by the pancreas which breaks down carbohydrates and starches.

Anabolic Steroid A type of steroid (not a corticosteroid like prednisone, cortisone, or dexamethasone) which promotes the building of tissues, like muscle.

Anaerobic Bacteria Bacteria which only live in an environment in which there is no or little oxygen, e.g., Clostridium tetani which causes tetanus.

Analgesia Pain relief.

Anamnestic Response The faster and greater immune response produced by an animal who has previously encountered that specific antigen. Memory cells are responsible for this more efficient response. Also called 'secondary response.'

Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis is a rare, life-threatening, immediate allergic reaction to something ingested or injected. If untreated, it results in shock, respiratory and cardiac failure, and death.

Androgen A hormone which produces male sexual characteristics, e.g., testosterone.

Anemia A condition in which the number of red blood cells present in the blood is lower than normal.

Anesthesia Loss of sensation or feeling; induced artificially with drugs to permit painful procedures such as surgery.

Angiography The x-ray of vessels after injecting a contrasting fluid.

Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibitor (ACE inhibitor) Drug which decreases the function of this particular enzyme. The angiotensin-converting-enzyme changes a compound called angiotensin I to angiotensin II. Angiotensin II is a potent blood vessel constrictor. ACE inhibitors, then, have the effect of dilating blood vessels, since less Angiotensin II is produced.

Anterior Positioned in front of another body part, or towards the head of the animal. Opposite of posterior.

Anthelmintic Medication which kills certain types of intestinal worms; dewormer.

Antibiotics Usually refers to drugs administered to kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria; not effective against viral infections.

Antibody Small disease-fighting proteins produced by certain types of cells called 'B cells.' The proteins are made in response to 'foreign' particles such as bacteria or viruses. These antibodies bind with certain proteins (antigens) on foreign particles like bacteria, to help inactivate them. See also Antigen.

Antibody Titer A measurement of the amount of antibodies in the blood. The test to measure antibodies is usually performed by making a number of dilutions of the blood and then measuring at what dilution there is sufficient antibody to react in the test. For example, a titer of 1:8 (one to eight) means the blood can be diluted to one part blood and seven parts saline and still produce a positive reaction in the test. The higher the titer (1:16 is higher than 1:8), the more antibody is present.

Anticholinergic Stopping the communications between certain nerves and muscles of the body including those of the gastrointestinal tract and heart. These nerves are called 'parasympathetic' nerves and do such things as constrict the pupils of the eye, stimulate contractions of the muscles in the intestine, and slow the heart rate. Anticholinergic drugs would have the effect, then, of dilating the pupil, slowing contractions of the intestines, and increasing the heart rate.

Anticholinesterase A drug that blocks the enzyme acetylcholinesterase; this results in stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system.

Anticoagulation Stopping the blood clotting process.

Anticonvulsant A drug used to prevent or decrease the severity of convulsions.

Antidiuretic Hormone A hormone produced by the pituitary gland that reduces the production of urine in the kidneys and therefore prevents water loss; also called 'vasopressin.'

Antiemetic An agent that decreases or stops vomiting.

Antifungal Drugs administered to kill or inhibit the growth of fungi (plural of fungus).

Antigen A molecular structure on surfaces of such particles as bacteria and viruses. This structure is recognized by the body as 'foreign' and stimulates the body to produce special proteins called antibodies to inactivate this foreign invader. See also Antibody.

Antiprotozoal An agent that kills protozoa, which are one-celled organisms such as Giardia.

Antipruritic Relieves itching.

Antipyretic A substance used to relieve fever.

Antiseptic A substance which inhibits the growth of bacteria, but does not kill them.

Antispasmodic An agent that relieves or decreases spasms in muscle. The muscle could include 'smooth muscle' which is the type of muscle in intestines that causes them to contract and move food through the digestive system.

Antitussive Cough suppressant.

Articular Pertaining to a joint.

Ascarid Roundworm.

Aspirate Withdraw fluid or cells through the use of suction - usually the suction produced by pulling back on the plunger of a syringe attached to a needle which is inserted into the area to be sampled. Also the breathing in of a fluid or foreign substances.

Asymptomatic A term used to decide a condition in which no symptoms are present.

ATP Adenosine triphosphate; a compound used for energy by cells.  

Aquaculture The (usually commercial) captive raising of fish, corals, and other aquatic life for aquariums, food, and scientific purposes.

Aqueous Humor The fluid found within the eyeball which provides nourishment to the interior eye structures and keeps the eyeball inflated.

Arteries Thick walled vessels that carry blood away from the heart to the lungs and body tissues; the pulmonary arteries carry deoxygenated blood to the lungs, but all other arteries carry oxygenated blood.

Atrium (Plural atria) The two chambers of the heart that receive blood. The right atrium receives blood from the body. The left atrium receives oxygenated blood from the lungs.

Attenuated Weakened. An attenuated virus is one which has been changed such that it will no longer cause disease. An attenuated virus would be used in a modified live vaccine.

Auscultate To listen for sounds produced within the body, usually with the aid of a stethoscope.

Autoimmune A condition in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissues. To properly function, the immune system must identify foreign substances such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, slivers, etc., and it must be able to distinguish normal body tissue from these foreign substances. If it fails to distinguish the difference, it attempts to destroy the tissue it wrongly identifies as foreign. For example, in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, the body destroys its own red blood cells. In rheumatoid arthritis it attacks the cells in the joints.

Axilla Armpit.

B

B Cell Also called 'B lymphocyte.' The type of lymphocyte which produces antibody. Compare with 'T cells.'

Bacteriocidal A description of an agent that kills bacteria.

Bacteriostatic A description of an agent that stops the growth (reproduction) of bacteria, but does NOT kill them.

Bacterium Microscopic organisms that lack nuclei and other organelles; pathogenic species cause disease, while nonpathogenic species are harmless.

Beta Blockers Heart medications which block certain receptors in the heart called beta receptors. The beta receptors receive signals which generally increase the heart rate. If the heart rate is abnormally fast and uneven, beta blockers will help stabilize the rate and rhythm of contractions.

Beta-Carotene A plant pigment which can be converted to Vitamin A by many animals, but not by cats.

Beta-Lactamases Enzymes produced by some bacteria which inactivate certain types of penicillin, thus making the bacteria resistant to them.

Bile A liquid produced by the liver, stored in the gall bladder, and dispensed into the small intestine as needed; aids in the digestion and absorption of fats.

Bile Acids Certain compounds produced by the liver, bound to amino acids, and excreted in the bile to aid in the digestion of fats.

Bilirubin An orange-yellow pigment in bile that is a product of red blood cell breakdown; it is normally excreted with the urine or feces, and a buildup in the body can cause jaundice.

Biopsy The surgical removal of a small amount of abnormal tissue, usually of tumors, for diagnosis.

Bitch A female dog.

Bladder A sac that receives and holds a liquid until it is excreted, e.g., urinary bladder, gall bladder; in fish, the swim bladder holds air.

Blood Gases Gases, such as oxygen or carbon dioxide, that are in the blood.

Blood Glucose A graph of blood glucose levels over time. At the time of insulin injection, and at regular intervals throughout the day, the level of glucose in the blood is determined through laboratory testing. Bone Marrow A soft tissue composed of blood vessels and connective tissues found at the center of bones; the primary function is blood cell production.

Bronchi The plural of bronchus, the large air passages of the lungs.

Bronchiole The small airways in the lung that come off of the larger bronchus; bronchioles are 1 mm or less in diameter.

Bronchodilator Medication which opens up the main air passages to the lungs.

Bronchoscope A tool designed to facilitate inspection of the trachea and bronchi; used in both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

Bronchoscopy The internal inspection of the trachea and bronchi using a bronchoscope.

BUN Short for 'blood urea nitrogen,' a blood test that estimates kidney function.

C

Cachexia Extreme weight loss.

Calorie The unit of measurement of energy derived from digested food. Fat contains about twice as many calories per gram as protein or carbohydrate.

Calcified The hardening of tissue through the influx of calcium, usually as a result of chronic inflammation.

Cancer A malignant tumor.

Candida A certain genus of yeast which can cause disease in humans and animals; an infection with Candida is called candidiasis.

Canine Pertaining to dogs.

Carapace The upper shell of a turtle or tortoise.

Carbohydrate Compounds made up of chains of sugar units. Simple carbohydrates include table sugar (sucrose), milk sugar (lactose), and fruit sugar (fructose). Complex carbohydrates are very long chains held together by bonds that may not be digestible in the stomach and intestine of a carnivore. Starch is a digestible complex carbohydrate. Seed hulls such as oat bran are digestible by ruminants and horses, but not carnivores.

Carcinogen A substance which causes cancer.

Cardiomyopathy Diseases of the heart muscle; does not include diseases of the valves of the heart or congenital defects.

Cardiopulmonary Relating to the heart and lungs.

Cardiovascular Related to the heart and blood vessels.

Carnivore An animal whose natural diet includes meat.

Carpus The wrist (front leg) of dogs and cats.

Carrier An animal which harbors an infectious organism, such as a virus, bacteria, or parasite. The animal does not appear ill, but can still transmit the organism to other animals by direct contact or releasing the organisms (bacteria, protozoa, viruses) into the environment in the stool, urine, respiratory secretions, or vaginal discharges.

Caudal A directional term used to refer to an area more toward the cauda, or tail region; opposite of cranial.

Cecum A blind sac that opens into the colon; found in many animals.

Centrifuge A machine that rapidly spins liquid samples and separates out the particles by their density.

Cerebellum A portion of the brain, located on the brainstem, that controls coordination.

Cerebral Relating to the part of the brain known as the cerebrum.

Cerebrum The largest portion of the brain that performs all higher cognitive functions and is situated in the front part of the cranial cavity.

Chelation Binding of a substance to a metal, thus helping the body to remove it.

Chemotherapy Treatment of a disease with chemical agents (drugs); the term is most commonly used to describe the treatment of cancer with medication.

Choana (Plural choanae) An opening between the nasal cavity and oropharynx (mouth) in birds and reptiles.

Chondroitin Decreases the activity of enzymes which break down cartilage in a joint.

Chronic Of a long duration: a chronic illness persists for weeks, months, or even for the life of animal. See also acute.

Chondroprotective Agent A nutritional supplement that protects cartilage.

Class I, II, III, IV Medications Drugs are classified by the Drug Enforcement Administration of the Department of Justice depending upon such criteria as the potential for human abuse.

Clinical Study A planned examination of the effectiveness of a new drug or treatment for a disease as compared to a control group not receiving the treatment; also called a clinical trial.

Cloaca A common tube-like structure through which feces, urine, and reproductive fluids/eggs pass in birds, turtles, and other lower vertebrates.

Clotting Factors Protein components in the blood which help it to clot. Clotting is a complex mechanism. In addition to platelets, clot formation is the result of a long chain of chemical reactions carried out by individual molecules called 'clotting factors.' Each factor is numbered such that factor I leads to a reaction with factor II forming a new substance. This then reacts with factor III and so on to factor XII.

Clutch The uninterrupted series of eggs laid by a hen, usually 2-6 depending on the bird species.

CNS Central nervous system. Includes the brain, spinal cord, and the nerves leading from them.

Coagulation The process of clotting.

Coccidia A one-celled parasite in the category of protozoa. In dogs and cats, coccidia are generally parasites of the intestinal tract.

Colon A part of the digestive tract, specifically the part of large intestine that extends from the cecum to the rectum.

Colostrum The antibody-rich first milk produced immediately before and after giving birth.

Comedo A blackhead, usually the result of a plugged gland within the skin.

Complete Blood Count A count of the total number of cells in a given amount of blood, including the red and white blood cells; often referred to as a 'CBC,' it is one of the most common tests done to check for abnormalities of the blood.

Computerized Tomography Scan (CT Scan) A radiological imaging procedure that uses x-ray pictures to produce "slices" through a patient's body; also called a computerized axial tomography (CAT).

Congenital A characteristic of an animal that is present at birth. It may be inherited or induced by events that occur during pregnancy.

Conjunctiva A thin membrane which lines the inside of the eyelids and covers part of the eyeball.

Contrast Agents A substance given orally or injected into a patient that makes the affected tissue easier to identify on an x-ray.

Core Vaccine Vaccine which should be given to all animals of certain species, example, parvovirus vaccine in dogs or panleukopenia in cats (see noncore vaccine).

Cornea The clear part of the front of the eye which allows light in.

Corticosteroid Hormones produced by the adrenal gland which are important to almost every function of cells and organs. They are divided into two groups: glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. Glucocorticoids regulate protein, carbohydrate, and fat metabolism. Mineralocorticoids regulate electrolyte balances.

Cortisol The main glucocorticoid; a hormone naturally produced by the adrenal gland; it is synthesized commercially as hydrocortisone and is used to reduce inflammation.

Coumestan Estrogen-like substance produced by certain plants such as alfalfa; types of phytoestrogen.

Coumestral Estrogen-like substances produced by certain plants such as alfalfa; types of phytoestrogen.

Cranial A directional term used to refer to the area near the cranium, or head region; opposite of caudal.

Crop An organ between the esophagus and stomach of many domestic birds, which serves as a temporary food storage organ.

Crust Area of dried fluid or cells on the skin. The fluid may have been blood, serum, pus, or medication.

Culture The process in which a sample of fluid or tissue is taken from an animal and placed in special media which allows the bacteria, virus, etc., to grow (reproduce) in the laboratory.

Cutaneous Relating to the skin.

Cyst An abnormal sac-like structure that is lined with cells which produce a liquid or thick material.

Cytokines Compounds produced by certain cells, which act as messengers to control the action of lymphocytes and other cells in an immune response.

Cytology The study of cells; often refers to the microscopic examination of a sample taken from the skin or lesion to look for the cause of a condition.

Cytoplasm Substances which make up the inside of a cell and surround the nucleus of the cell which contains the genetic material.

D

DEA Drug Enforcement Administration. The federal agency which regulates the manufacture, dispensing, storage, and shipment of controlled substances including medications with human abuse potential.

Decontaminate Remove injurious material.

Dermal Relating to the skin.

Dermatophyte Fungus that causes ringworm; include Trichophyton, Microsporum, and Epidermophyton.

Descenting The removal of the anal sacs of a carnivore to prevent the animal from releasing the very strong-smelling secretion.

Dextrose A commonly used name for glucose (sugar) solutions given intravenously to treat fluid or nutrient loss.

Diagnostic Tests Procedures run to find the cause of disease or discomfort; tests used to make a diagnosis.

Dialysis A process which involves removing waste products from the body.

Dietary Indiscretion Eating what one should not. Dogs with dietary indiscretion eat garbage, dead fish on shore, etc.

Digestibility Expressed as a percent, is a measure of the content of food that is retained in the body after food is eaten. The difference between the weight of food eaten and the weight of stool produced, divided by the weight of the food.

Digestive System The organ system including the mouth, teeth, tongue, esophagus, stomach, intestines, and various glands that functions to ingest, digest, and absorb nutrients.

Digitalis Glycosides Class of drugs including digitoxin and digoxin, which are drugs derived from the Digitalis purpurea plant, and used in the treatment of congestive heart failure.

Dinoflagellate Single-celled algae, mainly marine and often with a cellulose shell; some species may be luminescent, and some cause the red tides that are extremely toxic to marine life.

Disinfection The act of using chemicals or heat to kill germs.

Diuretic Agent which increases the secretion of urine, ridding the body of excess fluid.

Diurnal Active during the day, opposite of nocturnal, which means active during the night.

DNA Deoxyribonucleic acid, the chemical compound that occurs in cells and is the basic structure for genes.

Domestic Animal An animal that has been housed and fed by man for generations and has little fear of man as a result. Some domestic animals learn to depend on human provision so completely that they have little ability to survive if returned to a natural habitat.

Duodenum The first portion of the small intestine extending from the stomach to the jejunum; most chemical digestion and absorption of nutrients occurs here.

Duration of Immunity Length of time an animal is protected from a disease. Vaccines for some diseases provide long durations of immunity (years), while vaccines for some other diseases only provide immunity that lasts for 6 months.

E

Ear Canal The tube that connects the external ear with the ear drum.

Ear Drum The membrane that divides the outer ear from the inner ear, where the mechanism of hearing takes place. The membrane prevents infection from reaching the inner ear, as well as vibrating to amplify sounds.

ECG A printout of an analysis of the electrical activity in the heart.

Echocardiogram The image produced by performing an ultrasound examination of the heart.

Ectoparasite A parasite that lives on the outside surface or skin of another animal. Ectoparasites include fleas, ticks, lice, and mange mites.

Ectopic Non-malignant tissue growing in an unusual location (e.g., an ectopic pregnancy is conception of a normal embryo outside the normal location, which is the uterus).

EKG A printout of an analysis of the electrical activity in the heart.

Electrocardiogram A printout of an analysis of the electrical activity in the heart.

Electrocautery An instrument with a very hot tip, heated by electricity, is applied to a tissue. Electrocautery may be used to make an incision, remove a mass, or to stop bleeding.

Electrolyte Chemically, an element when dissolved in water, will cause the solution to transmit electricity. In medicine, certain elements in the blood which are critically important to life, including sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, and phosphorous.

Electroretinography The recording of electrical changes in the retina of the eye in response to stimulation by light.

Elizabethan Collar A large, plastic, cone-shaped collar used on cats, dogs, and birds to prevent them from licking or biting at skin, wound dressings, or casts.

Endocrine Pertaining to the secretion of hormones. The endocrine system consists of various glands which produce hormones.

Endoscope A long flexible instrument which can be passed into the body to view various structures through the use of fiber optics.

Endotracheal Tube This tube is placed into the animal's trachea (windpipe) to allow the oxygen and gases to be breathed into the lungs.

Enteral Feeding A method to feed an animal in which a tube is placed through the body wall into the intestine, and a nutritious liquid is forced through the tube into the intestine.

Envenomation The act of injecting a poisonous material (venom).

Enzyme Enzymes are special proteins produced by cells which cause chemical changes in other substances, but which are not themselves changed in the process.

Eosinophil A type of white blood cell that commonly increases in numbers as a response to parasites and allergies.

EPA Environmental Protection Agency. The agency of the federal government which licenses pesticides and herbicides.

Epidermis The top layer of the skin.

Erythrocyte Red blood cell; contains hemoglobin, which carries oxygen to the tissues.

Esophagus The muscular tube for the passage of food from the mouth to the stomach.

Estrogen A female hormone produced by the ovaries, which results in the onset of estrus.

Exotic An animal not native to the geographical area where it is living.

Extracranial Originating external to the cranial (brain) cavity.

Extrahepatic Outside of the liver.

F

False Negative Test Result The result of a diagnostic test is negative; but the animal actually does have the condition tested for.

False Positive Test Result The result of a diagnostic test is positive; but the animal actually does not have the condition tested for.

FDA Food and Drug Administration. The federal agency which approves drugs and medications for use in animals and people.

Feces Body wastes excreted through the anus from the large intestine; also called stool.

Feline Pertaining to cats.

Fetal Pertaining to an unborn animal, or fetus.

Fetus The developing young in the uterus before birth.

Fine Needle Aspirate Suction is applied to a hollow needle which has been inserted into tissue and a core of the tissue is withdrawn to culture and/or examine microscopically.

First Generation First generation: A description of medications developed from an earlier form of the medication. First generation medications were developed from the original form of the drug; second generation medications are adaptations of first generation drugs; third generation drugs are adaptations of second generation, etc.

Flea Dip A solution made to kill fleas, applied to an animal and not rinsed off, to allow it to have residual action.

Fluoroscopy An x-ray procedure in which x-rays are transmitted through the body onto a fluorescent screen; beneficial in that movement of joints or organ systems can be observed (e.g., the movement of material through the esophagus, stomach, and intestines).

Follicle The group of cells in the skin in which a hair or feather develops.

Foreign Body Any abnormal substance within the body. Examples include wood slivers, ingested cloth or balls, glass in the feet, etc.

Free Radical Atom which carries an unpaired electron; free radicals can potentially injure cells and may be responsible for numerous age-related diseases.

Fungicide A drug that kills fungi.

G

Gait The manner or style of movement; often used to assess horses or dogs for lameness.

Gastric Relating to the stomach.

Gastric Lavage To flush out the stomach.

Gastrointestinal Also known as GI. Pertaining to the stomach and intestines. The term 'digestive system' includes the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, anus, pancreas, and liver.

Germs Any microscopic organism that can potentially cause disease; includes viruses, bacteria, and fungi.

Gingival Relating to the gums.

Glipizide An oral medication that can be used to control blood glucose levels in some diabetic cats who still have some insulin production.

Glomerulus This literally means a small cluster; commonly used to refer to the renal glomerulus, the area of blood filtering in the kidney.

Glucocorticoid Hormones produced by the adrenal gland which regulate protein, carbohydrate and fat metabolism, and are important to almost every function of cells and organs. They also stabilize cell membranes which is an important part of their function in treating allergic reactions. Also called glucocorticosteroids.

Glucocorticosteroid Hormones produced by the adrenal gland which regulate protein, carbohydrate and fat metabolism, and are important to almost every function of cells and organs. They also stabilize cell membranes which is an important part of their function in treating allergic reactions. Also called glucocorticoids.

Glucosamine One of the building blocks the body uses to make new cartilage.

Glycogen A storage form of glucose in the body.

Glycosaminoglycans Compounds which serve as the building blocks of cartilage, which covers the ends of bones within a joint. Glucosamine and chondroitin are necessary for the body to make glycosaminoglycans.

Gram A measure of weight. 28 grams = 1 oz.; 454 grams = 1 lb.

Gram Negative A classification of bacteria based upon their lack of retention of a certain stain in the laboratory. The staining quality is based on the structure of the cell wall surrounding the bacteria. This structure of the cell wall influences which antibiotics will kill the bacteria. This laboratory staining method was developed by Hans Gram in 1884.

Gram Positive A classification of bacteria based upon their uptake of a certain stain in the laboratory. The staining quality is based on the structure of the cell wall surrounding the bacteria. This structure of the cell wall influences which antibiotics will kill the bacteria. This laboratory staining method was developed by Hans Gram in 1884.

H

H2 Antagonist A compound which binds (attaches) to the area on a cell at which histamine also binds. By binding at the same site, the antagonist blocks histamine from binding and prevents histamine from producing its effects, which include the production of stomach acid.

Half-life The time required for the level of a substance in the body (e.g., a drug or toxin) to be reduced by half.

Heartworm A species of parasitic worm (Dirofilaria immitis) that lives and reproduces in the chambers of the heart of an animal. Microscopic, immature worms (microfilariae) circulate in the blood and are taken in by mosquitoes that bite the animal. Microfilariae mature in the mouthparts of the mosquito and infect another susceptible animal bitten by the same mosquito.

Heinz Body A condition in which the red blood cells are destroyed and this results in anemia. The specific type of anemia is called 'Heinz body anemia' because the red cells develop an abnormality called a 'Heinz body' which can be seen under the microscope. This anemia can occur as a reaction to certain medications and also in cats who eat onions.

Hemodialysis A process used to remove waste products from the blood.

Hemoglobin A protein inside of red blood cells, responsible for the binding and transport of oxygen to the body tissues (Hb).

Hemolytic Causing the red blood cells to break open.

Hematocrit PCV (Packed Cell Volume), hematocrit: A laboratory test to monitor relative number of red blood cells present in the blood. A blood sample is placed in a tiny glass tube and spun in a centrifuge. The cells are heavier than the plasma and are compacted at one end of the tube. After the tube is spun, it is examined and the packed cell volume is determined as the percentage of the red cellular portion relative to the total amount of blood in the tube (i.e. remainder being the plasma). The normal for dogs is 40-59 and cats is 29-50.

Hematology The study of blood, its physiology and pathology.

Hemostat A small surgical instrument used to clamp blood vessels to prevent bleeding.

Hepatic Pertaining to the liver.

Herbivore Animal that eats primarily plants and vegetation.

High Titer Vaccine A modified live vaccine that contains a higher number of virus particles than the 'average' vaccine. High titer vaccines can generally elicit an immune system response in young animals who have a maternal antibody level that would prevent them from responding to an 'average' vaccine.

Histamine H2 Receptor Antagonist A compound which binds (attaches) to the area on a cell at which histamine also binds. By binding at the same site, the antagonist blocks histamine from binding and prevents histamine from producing its effects, which include the production of stomach acid.

Hob A male ferret.

Hormone Chemical substance produced by one part of the body which serves as a messenger to or regulator of the processes of another part of the body.

Host The organism in or on which a parasite lives. For example, dogs and cats are hosts for fleas and roundworms.

Hybrid An animal that has parents of two different species, for instance, a mule's mother is a horse and its father is a donkey.

Hyper A prefix meaning abnormally high or excessive.

Hypo A prefix meaning abnormally low or deficient.

I

Idiopathic Of unknown cause.

Immune system The body's defense system which recognizes infectious agents and other 'foreign' compounds (such as pollen), and works to destroy them.

Immunity A condition in which the animal's immune system has been primed and is able to protect the body from a disease-causing agent such as a certain virus or bacteria. An animal could have immunity to one agent, such as parvovirus, but not have immunity to another agent, such as rabies.

Immunization The process of rendering an animal protected (immune) against a certain disease. Vaccination is a way to produce immunization. However, just because an animal has been vaccinated (received a vaccine) does not necessarily mean the animal is immune. If the body did not correctly react to the vaccine or if the vaccine was defective, immunity would not occur. No vaccine produces immunity in 100% of the population to which it was given. 'Vaccination' is not the same as 'immunization.'

Immunostimulant A compound which stimulates the immune system to work more effectively to kill bacteria, viruses, or cancer cells.

Immunosuppressive Something, for instance a drug, hormone, or virus, that reduces the function of the immune system of an animal. An animal with reduced function of its immune system is called 'immunosuppressed.'

Incubation period The time between the exposure to a disease, causing agent, and the onset of signs of the disease.

Infectious Agents The organisms that cause infection; can be viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites.

Infestation A term used to describe an invasion of parasites.

Infusoria Microscopic organisms which are cultured as a food for the fry of freshwater fish.

Insoluble Carbohydrate Also, insoluble fiber. Fiber that resists enzymatic digestion in the small intestine.

Insulin A hormone produced by the pancreas which is necessary for glucose to be able to enter the cells of the body and be used for energy.

Intermediate Host In the life cycle of some parasites, the immature form of the parasite must pass through a different type of host (animal, insect, snail, etc.), called the intermediate host, before it can re-enter and infect the type of animal it came from. An example would be heartworms. The adult worm lives in the dog or cat. The immature form, laid by the adult heartworm, is taken up by the mosquito. The immature form develops within the mosquito, and is then reintroduced into another dog or cat where it develops into the mature adult and the cycle repeats itself. The intermediate host for heartworms, then, is the mosquito.

Intracellular An action taking place within a cell.

Intracranial Originating within the cranial (brain) cavity.

Intramuscular Into the muscle (IM).

Intranasal Into the nose.

Intravenous Into the bloodstream via a vein.

Iris The colored portion of the eye is called the iris. As with humans, dogs' iris colors vary. In the center of the iris is the black opening called the pupil. This opening can be made larger or smaller by muscles called ciliary bodies, that attach to the colored iris, causing it to expand or contract.

Isoflavone An estrogen-like substance produced by pasture plants; a type of phytoestrogen.

J

Jejunum The longest part of the small intestine extending from the duodenum to the ileum.

Jill A female ferret.

Jugular Referring to the neck; specifically, the large jugular veins that return blood from the head and neck to the heart.

K

Keratolytic Softens and loosens crusts and scales on the skin.

Killed Vaccine Vaccines which are made by taking the real, disease-causing viruses (or bacteria), killing them, and putting them into a liquid base. Compare with 'modified live vaccine' and 'recombinant vaccine.'

Kinetic Skull Having mobile joints between various parts of the skull, e.g., being able to unhinge the jaws. This allows the mouth of the animal, e.g., snake, to open wider so that it can eat large prey.

Kit A baby ferret.

L

Large Intestine The lower part of the intestinal tract, usually made up of the colon, cecum, and rectum. Bacteria that live harmlessly in the large intestine help to digest complex carbohydrates.

Larva The worm-like offspring of an insect (plural larvae).

Larynx The larynx is a muscular tube in the neck that allows air to pass from the throat to the trachea (windpipe). The larynx contains the vocal cords, which allow people and animals to make sounds. The larynx has cartilage that opens to allow air into the trachea.

Lipase Digestive enzyme, produced by the pancreas, which breaks down fat.

Liver The largest organ in the abdomen, responsible for producing enzymes required for digestion of food, and bile that helps to digest fat. The liver also detoxifies the blood and may be damaged in the process.

Low passage vaccine A low passage vaccine contains virus particles which have been attenuated, or weakened, less than those in the 'average' vaccine. Low passage vaccines can generally elicit an immune system response in young animals who have a maternal antibody level that would prevent them from responding to an 'average' vaccine.

Lymph Nodes Part of the immune system of an animal. Small masses of tissue that contain white blood cells called lymphocytes. Blood from the nearby area is filtered through the lymph node allowing foreign or infectious material to be recognized and destroyed if possible.

Lymphocytes The class of cells in the body which are responsible for mounting an immune response. Two main types are B cells and T cells.

Lymphokines Chemicals produced by T lymphocytes. Some lymphokines signal macrophages and other phagocytes to destroy foreign invaders.

M

Macrophage A type of phagocyte (cell in the body which 'eats' damaged cells and foreign substances such as virus and bacteria).

Malignant A process that does harm to nearby tissues. Usually synonymous with cancer, a tumor that grows quickly and spreads into other tissues.

Mammary Pertaining to the breast.

Mandible Lower jaw.

MAOIs Monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Substances that inactivate the enzyme monoamine oxidase which regulates certain transmitter chemicals between nerves. These compounds include certain types of antidepressants and also insecticides containing amitraz (such as Mitaban and Preventic collars).

Marsupial An order of mammals including kangaroos, opossums, and sugar gliders in which the female has a pouch on the abdomen which holds the young and has nipples for the young to nurse.

Masticate Chew.

Maternal Antibody Antibody in a newborn animal which the newborn acquired through the placenta or colostrum (the first milk).

Meal When referring to food ingredients, meal means a ground-up preparation. Chicken meal is ground up chicken, which might include bones and feathers. Meat meal means ground up muscle meat.

Median Survival Time Time at which 50% of the animals had died.

Memory (Immunologic) Memory: When an animal mounts an immune response against a foreign substance, some cells are created to 'remember' the antigens on that substance. If the animal is again exposed to the substance, these cells will help the body respond much faster and to a higher degree.

Metabolize Energy (ME) (ME) is the net energy available to an animal from a certain food.

Metacarpus The front limb between the carpus and the phalanges (toes).

Metatarsus The part of the rear limb between the tarsus and the phalanges (toes).

Microfilaria The larval form of some parasitic worms, for example heartworms. These worms do not lay eggs, they produce microfilariae (plural of microfilaria) instead.

Microfilaricide Compound which kills microfilaria, the immature forms of heartworms which circulate in the blood.

Microorganism A single-celled life form that is invisible to the naked eye and that may cause disease in man or animals.

Mineralization The process in which minerals are laid down within tissue in an abnormal pattern causing a hardening of the tissue.

Mineralocorticoids Hormones produced by the adrenal gland which regulate the amounts of sodium, potassium, and chloride in the blood.

Miticide An agent that kills mites.

Mitochondria Parts of the cell which are responsible for providing the cell with energy.

mL Short for milliliter. A liquid measure, the same volume as a cc. 28 mL = 1 liquid oz.

Metabolize To have molecules transformed within the body tissue through chemical processes.

Methemoglobin An altered hemoglobin which does not carry oxygen.

Modified Live Vaccine Vaccines which are made by taking the real, disease-causing virus and altering (attenuating) it in a laboratory to a non-disease causing virus. Compare with 'killed vaccine' and 'recombinant vaccine.'

Monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI): Substances that inactivate the enzyme monoamine oxidase which regulates certain transmitter chemicals between nerves. These compounds include certain types of antidepressants and also insecticides containing amitraz (such as Mitaban and Preventic collars).

Monovalent Vaccine A vaccine that is manufactured to stimulate the body to produce protection against only one disease, e.g., rabies vaccine. Compare with 'multivalent vaccine.'

Motility Movement, e.g., intestinal motility is the muscular contractions of the intestines which move the food from the stomach to the anus.

Mucolytic Breaks down mucous.

Mucopolysaccharide A carbohydrate which also contains a hexosamine molecule and is a component of mucous.

Mucosa Specialized membrane which covers various passages and cavities exposed to the air such as the mouth, nose, inner portion of the eyelids, vagina. Examination of the mucous membranes can provide important information: if they are dry, the animal is likely dehydrated; pale, and the animal may be anemic or in shock; yellow, and the animal is said to jaundiced due to accumulation of waste products which should be eliminated by the liver. Mucous membranes.

Mucous Membranes Specialized membrane which covers various passages and cavities exposed to the air such as the mouth, nose, inner portion of the eyelids, vagina. Examination of the mucous membranes can provide important information: if they are dry, the animal is likely dehydrated; pale, and the animal may be anemic or in shock; yellow, and the animal is said to be jaundiced due to accumulation of waste products which should be eliminated by the liver.

Multivalent Vaccine A vaccine that combines two or more components to stimulate the body to produce protection against all the components. Most 'distemper' vaccines for puppies are of the multivalent type, and commonly include distemper, parvovirus, adenovirus cough, hepatitis, and parainfluenza. Compare with 'monovalent' vaccine.

Musculoskeletal Pertaining to the muscles and skeleton.

Myelogram Radiograph (x-ray) of the spinal cord taken after a contrasting dye has been injected into the space around the spinal cord.

Myocardium The middle layer of heart muscle.

N

Nauplii Newly hatched brine shrimp.

Nebulize Convert into a fine spray form.

Necropsy Postmortem examination.

Necrosis The death and breakdown of cells.

Nematodes A common name for any roundworm of the phylum Nematoda.

Neoplasia Abnormal growth and accumulation of cells. Neoplasias may be benign or malignant.

Nephrotoxic Destructive to kidney cells.

Neurotransmitter Chemical used as a messenger from one nerve cell to another.

Neutralize To change from acidic or alkaline to a neutral pH.

Nocturnal Animals that are active during the night and sleep during the day.

Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory NSAIDS: Agents which reduce inflammation, but are not in the class of drugs known as steroids. Examples include aspirin, Rimadyl, and phenylbutazone.

Noncore Vaccine Vaccine which should only be given to animals at increased risk of exposure to a disease, example, leptospirosis in dogs or feline leukemia in cats (see core vaccine).

Nonpathogenic Not causing disease. Some bacteria, such as those that normally live in an animal's intestines, are nonpathogenic.

Nonseptic A condition not caused by an infection. For example, septic arthritis is caused by an infection with bacteria, yeast, or other agent; a case of nonseptic arthritis may be caused by injury or cancer.

Nucleated Erythrocytes Immature form of red blood cells.

Nutraceutical A very broad term describing certain components in food (plant or animal) or nutritional supplements, which contain substances normally present in the body that aid in the proper functioning of body systems.

Nutrient Compounds in foods which are essential for life. Nutrients include protein, fats, vitamins, minerals, etc.

O

Obligate Carnivore An animal that requires in its diet nutrients that are found in sufficient quantities only in meat or other animal products.

Occult Indicating a disease or condition that is clinically not apparent.

Ocular Relating to the eye.

Off Label Term used to describe the use of a medication for a condition for which it was not FDA approved. A large number of medications used in veterinary medicine are used 'off label.' If veterinarians only used FDA approved medications, options for treatments of certain conditions would be severely limited or nonexistent. The safety and efficacy of off-label uses of medications is often determined in university research settings, but the manufacturer of the drug does submit the results or go through the elaborate FDA approval process.

Offal Animal organs rejected at slaughter as unfit for human consumption, e.g., spleen, intestine, brain, lungs.

Omnivore Animal that eats both flesh and plants.

Opioid Narcotic drug which has an activity similar to that of opium.

Oral Hypoglycemic A medication, given by mouth, which lowers the level of glucose in the blood. Example: glipizide.

Osmotic Diuretic A compound that increases the amount of urine formed and rids the body of excess fluid by being filtered through the kidney into the urine in concentrated amounts and carrying water with it.

Otic Pertaining to the ear.

Ototoxic Destructive to the structures of the ear.

Over the Counter Can be purchased without a prescription, like aspirin and vitamins.

Ovulate The release of an egg from the ovary of the female.

Oxidize To combine with oxygen.

Oxytocin A hormone that stimulates milk flow in lactating mammals (females nursing their young), and contractions of the muscles of the reproductive tract in many species.

P

Packed Cell Volume (PCV), hematocrit: A laboratory test to monitor the relative number of red blood cells present in the blood. A blood sample is placed in a tiny glass tube and spun in a centrifuge. The cells are heavier than the plasma and are compacted at one end of the tube. After the tube is spun, it is examined and the packed cell volume is determined as the percentage of the red cellular portion relative to the total amount of blood in the tube (i.e., remainder being the plasma). The normal for dogs is 40-59 and cats is 29-50.

Palatable Tasty; refers to food that is readily accepted.

Palpation To examine with the hands or fingers.

Parasiticide Medication formulated to kill parasites.

Parasympathetic The portion of the nervous system which stimulates the pancreas to produce digestive enzymes and stimulates many of the smooth muscles in the body including those of the stomach and intestine. It also tends to slow the heart rate.

Parenterally A term used to describe the administration of a drug by means other than by mouth.

Pathogenic Causing disease.

Pathologist A specialist in veterinary medicine who examines the changes in body tissues and organs caused by disease.

PCV Packed cell volume. PCV, hematocrit: A laboratory test to monitor the relative number of red blood cells present in the blood. A blood sample is placed in a tiny glass tube and spun in a centrifuge. The cells are heavier than the plasma and are compacted at one end of the tube. After the tube is spun, it is examined and the packed cell volume is determined as the percentage of the red cellular portion relative to the total amount of blood in the tube (i.e., remainder being the plasma). The normal for dogs is 40-59 and cats is 29-50.

Penicillinase An enzyme produced by some bacteria which inactivates certain types of penicillin thus making the bacteria resistant to them.

Perineal The area between the anus and the genital organs.

Peritoneal Dialysis A process used to remove waste products from the body. Electrolyte fluids are administered into the abdomen, waste products of the body enter the fluids, and then the fluids are removed.

Peritoneum The membrane lining the wall of the abdominal cavity.

Phagocyte Cell in the body which 'eats' damaged cells and foreign substances such as virus and bacteria. A macrophage is a type of phagocyte.

Phalanges Toes.

Pheromone Chemical secreted by an animal and sensed by another animal of the same species, and often causing behavior change in that animal.

Photoperiod The number of hours of light per 24-hour period.

Phytochemical Substances in plants which affect a body system and may promote health and decrease the risk of a disease such as cancer.

Phytoestrogen Substances which have an activity similar to estrogens and are produced by plants.

Placebo A substance which is given that has no therapeutic value; often called a 'dummy pill' or 'sugar pill.' Often given to half of the patients in a trial of a new drug, to better assess the effectiveness of the new drug.

Platelets Cellular components found in the blood which help clots to form. In the body, microscopically small vessels often break in the normal course of events. Platelets and a protein called fibrinogen 'plug' the break in the vessel and prevent blood from leaking out.

Posterior Positioned in back of another body part, or towards the rear half of the animal. Opposite of anterior.

Postoperative After surgery.

Prepuce The sheath of skin which covers the penis.

Proestrus The stage of the estrus cycle, right before an animal comes into heat.

Progesterone A hormone produced by the ovaries which is responsible for the continuation of pregnancy.

Prognosis The forecasted outcome and recovery.

Prolactin Hormone secreted by the pituitary gland that stimulates the growth of mammary tissue and the production of milk.

Prostaglandin Several types of chemicals made by cells which have specific functions such as controlling body temperature, stimulating smooth muscle, and influencing heat cycles.

Protease Enzyme which breaks down protein.

Protozoans Single-celled animals invisible to the naked eye. Most are free living and a few are parasites in animals or man.

Psittacine Birds that belong to the order Psittaciformes. Common psittacines include budgies, cockatiels, lories, cockatoos, conures, amazons, African greys, lovebirds, senegals, and jardines.

Pulmonary Relating to the lungs.

Pulmonary Arteries The large vessels leading from the heart to the lungs.

Pupa A dormant form of an insect (plural pupae). A larva spins a cocoon to protect itself, and becomes a pupa. The pupa does not feed, but gradually changes form and becomes a new adult.

Q

Queen A female cat used for breeding.

R

Radiology X-ray.

Reagent Grade A compound with the purity and quality that allows it to be used in a laboratory.

Recombinant Vaccine There are certain antigens on viruses and bacteria which are better at stimulating an antibody response by the animal than others. The genes for these antigens can be isolated, and made to produce large quantities of the antigens they code for. A recombinant vaccine contains these antigens, not the whole organism. Compare with 'modified live vaccine' and 'killed vaccine.'

Recumbency Lying down.

Reflex Ovulator Only ovulating after being bred. Cats are reflex ovulators, dogs are not.

Regulation Using insulin to maintain the blood glucose level of an animal within the acceptable range.

Renal Pertaining to the kidneys.

Resistance A term used to describe bacteria which have mutated or changed so they are not affected by an antibiotic that previously killed them or slowed their growth. As more bacteria become resistant to various antibiotics, there are fewer antibiotics which will influence them, thus newer and stronger antibiotics will need to be developed. Inappropriate use of antibiotics (using them too often, for too short a duration or in insufficient dose) may promote the development of resistance.

Respiratory Relating to breathing or the lungs.

Retina The rear interior surface of the eyeball is called the retina. The retina contains nerve cells referred to as rods and cones. The rods are sensitive to light and the cones to color. The retina receives the light and color and converts them into nerve impulses which go to the brain.

S

Scute In turtles and tortoises, the plates which cover the bony portion of the shell. In snakes, the larger, thicker scales on the underside of the body which provide support, protection, and traction.

Sebaceous Gland A gland in the skin which produces an oily substance.

Second Generation A description of medications developed from an earlier form of the medication. First generation medications were developed from the original form of the drug; second generation medications are adaptations of first generation drugs; third generation drugs are adaptations of second generation, etc.

Secondary Infection Infection which occurs because the tissue and its natural defenses have been damaged by another condition.

Seizure Threshold The level of stimulation at which a seizure is produced. Raising the seizure threshold makes it less likely a seizure will occur.

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRIs), Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: Medications which slow down the ability of nerve cells to absorb serotonin, a neurotransmitter (chemical that serves as a messenger between nerves). Example: Prozac.

Serology Laboratory testing for antibody-antigen reactions and antibody levels.

Serotype A subdivision of a species of microorganism, e.g., a bacteria, based upon its particular antigens.

Serous Thin and watery.

Serum The fluid portion of the blood after it has clotted and the cells have been removed.

Skin Cytology Examination, with a microscope, of a skin scraping or material from swabbing the skin. The material may be stained and checked for the presence of yeast, bacteria, tumor cells, etc.

Skin Scraping Scraping some material from the surface of the skin and looking at it under a microscope, e.g., to check for skin mites.

Soluble Carbohydrate Also, soluble fiber. Easily digested carbohydrates like starch.

Sphincter A ring-like band of muscle that constricts a passage or closes an opening, e.g., the anal sphincter constricts to close the anus and relaxes when the animal is passing stool. The urethral sphincter closes the urinary bladder.

Spirochete A type of bacteria which is long, slender, and assumes a spiral shape. Leptospira species and the bacteria that causes Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) are spirochetes.

Spleen Part of the immune system of an animal. A large, tongue-shaped organ in the abdomen containing many lymphocytes. The spleen filters blood and removes damaged cells. It can also manufacture new blood cells if the animal's bone marrow is damaged.

Squamate Scaly-bodied reptile including lizards and snakes.

SSRI Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: Medications which slow down the ability of nerve cells to absorb serotonin, a neurotransmitter (chemical that serves as a messenger between nerves). Example: Prozac.

Struvite A chemical compound, magnesium ammonium phosphate, which is made by the body and can form crystals and stones in the urinary bladder.

Subcutaneous Under the skin; often called 'sub Q.'

Substrate Relative to the husbandry of reptiles, amphibians, and small mammals, the substrate is the material that lines the bottom of a cage.

Sulfonamides A class of antibiotics which contain sulfur. They are bacteriostatic (they stop the growth (reproduction) of bacteria, but do NOT kill them).

Superfecundation Having a litter with more than one father (or breeding).

Sympathomimetic Producing effects similar to the 'flight or fight' response, which means the body is alerted to a danger of some sort and prepares to basically run or fight. Sympathomimetic effects include increased heart rate, sweating, and increased blood pressure.

Synergist An agent that enhances the action of another.

Synovial Pertaining to a joint made up of bone ends covered with cartilage, ligaments, a cavity filled with synovial fluid (joint fluid) and an outside fibrous capsule, e.g., hip joint, elbow joint.

Systemic Throughout the body.

T

T Cell Also called 'T lymphocytes.' The type of lymphocyte which is responsible for cell-mediated immunity. T cells may directly kill a cell or produce chemicals called lymphokines that activate macrophages which will kill the cell. Compare with 'B cell.'

Tachycardia An abnormally high heart rate.

Tachypnea Rapid breathing.

Tarsus The ankle (rear leg) of dogs and cats; also called the hock.

Temporomandibular Joint The joint between the lower jaw and the skull.

Third Generation A description of medications developed from an earlier form of the medication. First generation medications were developed from the original form of the drug; second generation medications are adaptations of first generation drugs; third generation drugs are adaptations of second generation, etc.

Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone Hormone produced by the hypothalamus that stimulates the pituitary gland to produce thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone-TSH), which in turn stimulates the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormone. Also called TSH releasing factor or TSH releasing hormone.

Titer A measurement of the amount of antibodies in the blood. The test to measure antibodies is usually performed by making a number of dilutions of the blood and then measuring at what dilution there is sufficient antibody to react in the test. For example, a titer of 1:8 (one to eight) means the blood can be diluted to one part blood and seven parts saline and still produce a positive reaction in the test. The higher the titer (1:16 is higher than 1:8), the more antibody is present. (NOTE: The word 'titer' may also be used when discussing the amount of antigen present, e.g., a high titer vaccine has a large number of virus particles.)

Topical To be used on the skin.

Transport Host An animal or insect which carries an immature parasite from one mammalian host to another.

Tubule Microscopic ducts. The tubules in the kidneys help to concentrate the urine.

U

Ultrasound Ultrasound/ultrasonography: A technique used to get the image of a deep structure within the body by directing ultrasound waves at it and recording the reflections (echoes) from it.

Umbilicus The area of the body where the umbilical cord is attached; the belly button.

Urate A chemical compound which contains uric acid and is made by the body, and can form crystals and stones in the urinary bladder. Uric acid is a waste product from the breakdown of certain proteins.

Urea Wasteproduct of protein metabolism that is removed from the body by the kidneys.

Urease An enzyme that breaks down urea. Urea is a waste product of protein metabolism that is removed from the body by the kidneys.

USP United States Pharmacopeia - a drug regulating agency.

V

Vaccination The act of giving a vaccine. See also 'immunization,' since the two words have different meanings and are often confused.

Vasodilator Agent which dilates, or increases the diameter of blood vessels.

Vena Cava Either of two large veins carrying blood to the right atrium of the heart. The cranial vena cava brings blood from the head region, front legs, and upper chest to the heart; the caudal (or posterior) vena cava carries blood from the areas of the abdomen and hind legs to the heart.

Vent The outside opening of the cloaca, which is a common passageway for feces, urine, and reproduction.

Ventricle The chambers of the heart that pump the blood to the body or lungs.

Vertebrate Animal with a vertebral column (spine); includes such animals as fish, birds, turtles, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals.

Vesicle Small elevated area on the skin filled with a clear fluid.

Vestibular System Portions of the inner ear, nerves, and brain which help the body maintain balance.

Villi Microscopic projections which cover the intestine, greatly increasing the surface area and therefore, increasing the ability to absorb nutrients. Singular: Villus.

Viscerocutaneous Pertaining to the internal organs and skin.

Viscosity Thickness of a fluid, e.g., molasses is more viscous than water.

Vital Signs The signs of life which are pulse, respiration, and temperature.

Vomeronasal Organ Sensory organ also called 'Jacobson's organ,' which detects pheromones.

W

Warm-Blooded Having a relatively high body temperature that is regulated internally and is independent of the environmental temperature. Mammals and birds are warm-blooded.

White Blood Cells Cells in the blood whose major role is to defend the body against invading organisms such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi. There are different types of leukocytes: lymphocytes are part of the immune system; monocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils eat or engulf organisms; basophils contain histamine and are involved in inflammatory reactions.

Window of Susceptibility A time period in the life of a young animal in which the maternal antibodies are too low to provide protection against a certain disease, but too high to allow a vaccine to work and produce immunity.

X

Y

Z

Zoonotic A disease which can be transmitted between animals and people.

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